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Author Topic: Winter's coming but don't wait for Spring!  (Read 3836 times)

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Offline Rebel

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Winter's coming but don't wait for Spring!
« on: September 21, 2015, 05:47:02 PM »
No, not the latest series of Game of Thrones!

Carried out a regular routine clean of my computer today, mainly paid attention to the intake fans at the front. Final inspection of the interior looks fairly clear, nothing major but wait... What's going on behind the scene with my CPU cooling system!

Closer inspection reveals my radiator is clogged up with dust. Don't forget to check all your crooks and crannies folks!








Offline ydy

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Re: Winter's coming but don't wait for Spring!
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2015, 09:21:22 AM »
 ::)
If I remember correctly last time was even worse :)

Offline mkers

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Re: Winter's coming but don't wait for Spring!
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2015, 10:53:16 PM »
Reb, I wish my PC needed a radiator :P

My graphics card gets clogged up too now and again. I use a small paint brush and lung power to get most of it out because it's a pain in my case in my case (?) to take the actual card out. It's surprising how all this dust affects not only the life of our computers but also the performance too.

Offline Ernesto ep5

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Re: Winter's coming but don't wait for Spring!
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2015, 01:02:19 AM »
Yeah heat makes the electron move slower right? Like it's getting more resistance.

Offline Rebel

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Re: Winter's coming but don't wait for Spring!
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2015, 01:11:35 AM »
No Eps, just overheating from blocking fan vents and if deep enough insulating parts and overheating them that way, cooler parts last longer.

Offline Ernesto ep5

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Re: Winter's coming but don't wait for Spring!
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2015, 10:43:42 AM »
uuuuuuh wat yeah? im confused.

Offline Rebel

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Re: Winter's coming but don't wait for Spring!
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2015, 11:18:06 PM »
What I meant Eps was that from what I know dust doesn't stop or slow down electrons from getting from one side of the computer to the other. The only effects are those I stated above.

Offline Ernesto ep5

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Re: Winter's coming but don't wait for Spring!
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2015, 12:15:45 PM »
I never meant dust.. Like Jake said, you just wanna be right by saying I'm wrong, but I'm right, right?... Plus that sentence was really hard to read man.. Can I get an second opinion on this? :P

Offline Ernesto ep5

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Re: Winter's coming but don't wait for Spring!
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2015, 03:48:06 PM »
I just want to add that extreme heat can slow down and crash the computer as seen in a video we might have seen before.

https://youtu.be/y39D4529FM4

There might not be a noticeable difference, or we don't care, when it's just clogged up vents.  But I have seen much worse at my job. I have seen dust and smoke turn into something like cake. Urgh! Such a thing will surely destroy components faster than normal. But some say, at that time it would be time to upgrade anyway. :P



And I couldn't find much about it, just this interesting bit:


"Best Answer:  DC (direct current) only flows in one direction. AC (alternating current) is current which changes direction back and forth with a regular period.
The electrons really do flow. If you look at the "drift", or physical motion of an individual electron, it is much slower than you might think. In a 12-gauge copper wire carrying 20 Amps of current, the average speed of an electron is quite slow; about 1/250 of a mile per hour. There's just so many electrons moving along so slowly that it adds up to a substantial current.
Why then, when you flip a switch, does the light turn on so quickly? That's due to wave propagation, which is much faster. Think of waves in the deep ocean; the waves can move quite quickly, but if you're swimming in it, you're not moving nearly so quickly. You feel a slight up and down motion, but the wave may be propagating at 30 MPH. The water itself is not flowing along across the surface at 30 MPH, but the wave is.
It is exactly the same with electrons. While the wave is moving very quickly, the electrons themselves move very little. In the wiring of your house carrying 20 Amps of AC current, the electrons are wiggling back and forth 60 times per second over a distance of about one thousandth of an inch.
However, the wave moves much much faster, when you flip the switch, the change in voltage travels along the wiring at very near the speed of light (it's slowed down about 30% below the speed of light by the plastic insulation on the wire).
With that prelude, to answer your questions:
- the copper wire is not typically called an ion. During current flow, an atom may hand its extra electron to the next copper atom, but it also gets an electron from the atom on the other side. Thus, each atom always stays about neutral in charge. This is described as the copper atoms forming a lattice through which the "sea" of electrons can freely flow.
- a heater does not work by converting kinetic energy of electrons to heat quite the way you describe. Instead, it uses the electrical energy available on the conductors of the power cord, which takes the form of electrostatic force of attraction which pushes electrons from the negative line to the positive line. As an electron eneters the heating element from the negative line, it feels a strong force of attraction towards the other end of the heating element, which is connected to the positive line. The electron accelerates due to this force, and speeds up somewhat, but it travels only a fraction of a millimeter before it collides with a microscopic defect in the lattice of the heating element, and decelerates and transfers its kinetic energy into vibration of the lattice of atoms of the heating element (i.e. into heat). It then accelerates again, then hits another defect.
The main thing which distinguishes the metal of the heating element from the metal of the copper wires feeding them is that the heating element has a higher density of lattice defects (i.e. higher resistance). An excellent analogy is American falls at Niagra, where the water approaches in a deep, broad stream moving relatively slowly at high potential (i.e. the negative copper wire), then tumbles down quickly under acceleration of gravity, losing potential, but hitting a bunch of rocks on the way down. Hitting each rock slows the water down, and also transfers some heat to the rock, but after each impact the water accelerates again as it falls to the next rock. Then, the water leaves at lower potential in another slow, deep stream (i.e. the positive copper wire)."



Well all I know is to keep things clean 'n cool!

Here's another thing that's cool. https://youtu.be/zPqEEZa2Gis